Tuesday, October 3, 2017

October is Breast Cancer Awareness Month


October is Breast Cancer Awareness Month.
But, we should always be aware of the signs and symptoms of breast cancer.
Early detection can save lives!
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Facts About Breast Cancer In The United States

  • One in eight women in the United States will be diagnosed with breast cancer in her lifetime.
  • Breast cancer is the most commonly diagnosed cancer in women.
  • Breast cancer is the second leading cause of cancer death among women.
  • Each year it is estimated that over 252,710 women in the United States will be diagnosed with breast cancer and more than 40,500 will die.
  • Although breast cancer in men is rare, an estimated 2,470 men will be diagnosed with breast cancer and approximately 460 will die each year.
  • On average, every 2 minutes a woman is diagnosed with breast cancer and 1 woman will die of breast cancer every 13 minutes.
  • Over 3.3 million breast cancer survivors are alive in the United States today

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The Breast Cancer Site
The Breast Cancer Site was founded to help fund free mammograms for women in need – women for whom early detection would not otherwise be possible ‐ and is a leader in online activism and in the fight to prevent breast cancer deaths.

Visitors to The Breast Cancer Site can click on the “Click Here to Give – it’s FREE” button to help provide mammograms to those in need. Mammograms are paid for by the site’s sponsors.

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When breast cancer starts out, it is too small to feel and does not cause signs and symptoms.
As it grows, however, breast cancer can cause changes in how the breast looks or feels.

Symptoms may include—

New lump in the breast or underarm (armpit).
Thickening or swelling of part of the breast.
Irritation or dimpling of breast skin.
Redness or flaky skin in the nipple area or the breast.
Pulling in of the nipple or pain in the nipple area.
Nipple discharge other than breast milk, including blood.
Any change in the size or the shape of the breast.
Pain in any area of the breast.

Read more:
http://www.cdc.gov/Features/BreastCancerAwareness/
http://www.nationalbreastcancer.org/
http://www.nbcam.org/
http://www.breastcancerawareness.com/

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